How Outsourcing and Onlinejobs.ph helps Filipinos Avoid Discrimination


Like most recent graduates, Charm had big plans when she started looking for work. She imagined a job that would give her purpose, independence, and friendships that would last a lifetime.

Sadly, reality doesn’t work like that. College equipped Charm with the skills and knowledge to join the workforce. But it didn’t prepare her for the discrimination she’d face.

We’d like to think that in 2019, discrimination would no longer exist. Sadly, this isn’t the case for members of the LGBTQI community. Most people don’t look beyond your appearance. If you don’t fit in a box, you then you won’t fit in their workplace. It doesn’t matter if you have a great resume and an amazing portfolio, who you choose to love seems to be a factor on how well you can do your job.

This is especially true here in the Philippines. Despite the fact that we LGBTQI celebrities and politicians, most still experience discrimination due to our deeply religious culture.

Eventually, she quit her job.

Charm has a cousin who worked as a VA who encouraged her to try applying for online work as a graphic designer. Her talent, experience and work ethic helped her find clients. It was with online work where Charm felt completely accepted for who she is. It didn’t matter to her clients that she was gay, all they saw was a talented young designer. She was appreciated the good work that she did. She found the independence that she craved. And found acceptance from people halfway across the world.

There are thousands of talented Filipino workers out there like Charm who are hungry for work. They’re ready and eager to share their talent to the rest of the world. You can find them here at Onlinejobs.ph.


Julia Sta RomanaAbout Julia Jasmine M. Sta Romana
Julia has been working for OnlineJobs.ph since 2012, first as a writer and now as its social media manager and content development specialist. She also founded the Davao Virtual Assistants Association, the biggest VA association in Davao City

She’s a full-time wife and mom and volunteers her time as an internet rights advocate.

You can follow Julia on Twitter and through her blog.

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